HEARD ON THE STREET: 9.3.15

Help Wanted on City Boards and Commissions

MONTPELIER — The City of Montpelier is seeking individuals interested in filling a handful of empty seats. The  design review committee is seeking someone to fulfill a three-year term, which expires in October 2018, as well as a one-year alternate term, which expires in October 2016. The planning commission seeks two persons for two-year seats, which will expire in September 2017. The Montpelier Housing Authority seeks someone to serve a five-year term, which will expire in October, 2020. And, finally, the historic preservation commission seeks two members, one to fill a two-year term ending in September 2017, and one to fill a three-year term ending in September 2016.

Those interested are asked to submit a letter of interest with a brief resume by noon on Wednesday, September 16, to the City Manager’s Office, City Hall — 39 Main Street, Montpelier, Vermont 05602, or via e-mail to spitonyak@montpelier-vt.org. City Council will make this appointment at their September 23rd meeting; applicants will be notified and encouraged to attend. All municipal meetings are accessible to people with disabilities and are held in accordance with the public meeting and public records laws.

 

City Replacing Terrace Street Culverts

MONTPELIER — Starting this week, work will begin to replace the existing metal arch culvert at the intersection of Terrace Street and Walker Terrace. The project will include the removal and replacement of the existing culvert that runs across Walker Terrace, then turns and runs across Terrace Street.

Walker Terrace will be closed for one day while the culvert is being installed across the roadway. Residents on the street will be provided 24 hours notice prior to this closure and provided parking along Dairy Lane if requested during the closure.

Terrace Street will have one-way traffic maintained throughout the project with a temporary detour around the edge of the construction limits during the street crossing. There may be some delays for motorists, so please plan accordingly.

A tentative schedule from the contractor performing this work is available on the city’s website http://www.montpelier-vt.org/  — but is subject to change if inclement weather or material delivery delays are encountered.

If you have any questions or concerns, please call the Department of Public Works at 802-223-9508.

 

Hunter Ed Courses Available Now, Not Later

MONTPELIER — If you haven’t completed a Vermont hunter education course but want to before hunting seasons, this is the time to act according to the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

“Vermont’s volunteer instructors of hunter education courses are scheduling their courses now on Vermont Fish and Wildlife’s website,” said Nicole Meier, hunter education specialist.  “The courses have started and will continue for a few weeks, and fewer courses will be available by October because many instructors will be hunting.”

Anyone who wants to obtain their first Vermont hunting license must first pass the state-sanctioned course. Upcoming courses are listed on Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s website (www.vtfishandwildlife.com).

 

Trees Limbs Weighed Down by Fruit

The weather this summer has produced an unusually heavy “fruiting year,”  according to Lincoln Earle-Centers of Sylvan Tree Care to The Bridge. What he’s seeing is apple trees, crabapple trees, any fruit bearing trees heavily laden with fruit which is leading broken limbs and tops. “The danger is that trees are becoming heavily damaged and the “tearing” he says will produce such problems as rot and disease.” The fruit is weighing down the trees and when the limbs break off they leave wounds and tears that make the tree vulnerable to rot and disease.

Earle-Centers recommends that any branches that are too heavily weighed down need to  be shaken to make the fruit fall to the ground.  He added, “Anything that’s in reach, you can just grab and shake. If it’s not within reach,” he said, “take a pole to shake the limb. If you don’t have a pole find someone to make you a long enough pole with a fork in it so you can shake the limbs.”  The message, he said, is “Get the fruit off the trees before the limbs break. The heavy fruit is causing tree damage.” Every apple tree I’m seeing is  damaged or about to be damaged … The apples aren’t even at full weight yet.”

 

Youth Start Micro Newspaper in The MeadowTheMeadowDaily

MONTPELIER — Winter Street resident Sarah McGinnis recently told The Bridge that a new daily newspaper has been showing up at her house. The Meadow Daily, with bylines from Fraya Hubbard and Sarah Greene, tackles topics such as saving endangered species, rescuing animals (such as cats and dogs in high-kill shelters) and eating local. McGinnis said she knows the girls and their parents and that she looks forward to getting each issue.

 

Home Sales Up This Year

MONTPELIER — Sales volume increased to 138 sales for the April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 period, up 6 percent compared to the 2014 Study. The number of sales in the 2014 Study showed a 9 percent increase over the number of sales in the 2013 Study.

Sales from April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2015 continue to demonstrate an increasing real estate market in Montpelier.

There were a total of 82 residential sales, up from 76 in last year’s study. Thirty-four sales were between $60,000 and $199,000; 26 sales were between $200,000 and $299,000; 16 sales were between $300,000 and $399,000; four sales were between $400,000 and $499,000 and two sales were over $500,000. The volume of sales up to $400,000 was up slightly compared to last year’s study period, while residential sales over $400,000 declined from 11 last year to six in this year’s study.

From the 2015 Annual Sales Study prepared by the City of Montpelier. The study is the basis for calculating the common level of appraisal for the upcoming year.

 

The C-Span Campaign Bus Stops at Montpelier High School

MONTPELIER — C-SPAN’s award-winning, 45-foot customized bus visited Montpelier High School September 2. It was scheduled to visit three other Vermont high schools as well. The bus travels the country to promote C-SPAN’s “Road to the White House” program by visiting universities, schools and political events. Additionally, the bus will feature a customized 2016 campaign app allowing visitors to explore potential presidential candidates, events and footage during the campaign trail.

This fall, as the supreme court convenes for its 2015 session, C-SPAN will debut a new 12-part history series produced in cooperation with the National Constitution Center, exploring the issues, people and places involved in some of the most significant Supreme Court cases in our nation’s history. During the series the C-SPAN Bus will select law schools throughout the country to inform students of its new series.

Students and residents will step aboard the bus to learn about the public affairs network’s programs and resources, including its in-depth coverage of the U.S. Congress, White House, federal courts and the American political process. Through interactive exhibits, students and educators will also learn about C-SPAN’s campaign 2016 coverage and its new history series, Supreme Court Landmark cases.

Civic and government educators will learn about C-SPAN’s free comprehensive online educational resources including C-SPAN.org, C-SPAN Classroom and C-SPAN’s nationwide documentary contest, StudentCam, open to students in grades six through 12.

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